The OddShrimp’s Ocean Report (March edition)

The OddShrimp’s Ocean Report (March edition)

Most news is very land-oriented. But what’s been happening lately underneath the waves? Peeing fishes and journeys to the bottom of the sea: this is the OddShrimp’s Ocean Report for March 2017. Continue reading “The OddShrimp’s Ocean Report (March edition)”

Curious Critters – The Ghost Crab

Curious Critters – The Ghost Crab

When Dutch naturalists made a stop at the Cocos islands on their way to Indonesia in 1820, they were struck by the cleanliness of the beaches. Usually, the beach is a great place to find remains of all sorts of washed up marine life – mussels, seaweed, fishes, etc. – but on the Cocos islands they could barely find anything. A little patient observation provided the explanation for this odd state of affairs: these islands are very rich in crabs, and crabs like to keep their front yard tidy. None more so than the adorable ghost crabs. Continue reading “Curious Critters – The Ghost Crab”

Weekly Water Critter – The Amazing Jesus Fish

Weekly Water Critter – The Amazing Jesus Fish
 I came across a rather curious object recently: an isolated skull roof (with a few attached vertebrae) of a catfish, placed on a soft bed of black felt, nicely decorated with shiny sea shells. While worthy of aesthetic appreciation in and of itself, this is not the reason why these objects are sold at rather large quantities in (especially) the United States. For if you flip it over, a familiar figure reveals itself: a humanoid shape on a cross. Jesus, undoubtedly. Continue reading “Weekly Water Critter – The Amazing Jesus Fish”

Weekly Water Critter – The Christmas Tree Worm

Weekly Water Critter – The Christmas Tree Worm

Ah, Christmas. The time of cozy family get-togethers, presents, embarrassing sweaters, somewhat excessive amounts of food, terrible music, and of course indoor trees. We all look forward to this time of the year, but in some places it is Christmas all year round, thanks to the christmas tree worm. The colourful feeding appendages of this little tube worm indeed resemble christmas trees remarkably well, providing a nice holiday-themed decoration to the usually already festively coloured coral reefs. Continue reading “Weekly Water Critter – The Christmas Tree Worm”

Weekly Water Critter – The Archerfish

Weekly Water Critter – The Archerfish

This is a suggestion for those who have always wanted to have an aquarium, but were unsure about what kind of fish to put into it. After all, some fishes can be a bit boring, behaviour-wise, so if you want your aquarium to be more than just a kind of screensaver or animated wallpaper, the archerfish is the way to go, for it has one of the most adorable hunting behaviours you’ll ever find. In its preferred natural habitat, the mangrove forests of South-East Asia, there’s a lot of vegetation floating on and hanging over the water, with many delicious bugs on them. Only, they’re just out of reach. Continue reading “Weekly Water Critter – The Archerfish”

Weekly Water Critter – The Tunnyfish

Weekly Water Critter – The Tunnyfish

Ask anyone for a list of five fish species and there’s likely to be a tuna among them. This fame is of course not entirely unrelated to the fact that we consume it in rather large quantities, which has led to a serious decline in tuna stocks around the world (making the old nickname “common tunnyfish” somewhat less fitting nowadays). What few people realise, however, is that the tuna is one of the top predators of the oceans, right up there with the big sharks and toothed whales. Continue reading “Weekly Water Critter – The Tunnyfish”

Weekly Water Critter – The Blue Dragon

Weekly Water Critter – The Blue Dragon

After some soul searching I have recently decided to expand my territory from weekly fishes to weekly water critters in general, for the seas, lakes and rivers of the world are filled with too many amazing animals to just limit myself to the scaly ones. And what better way to start than by presenting one of my favourite animals of all time, the little marine sea slug Glaucus atlanticus. Known by various wonderful names including sea swallow and blue dragon, this stunningly beautiful creature employs one of the most nifty acts of thievery in the animal kingdom. Continue reading “Weekly Water Critter – The Blue Dragon”

Weekly Fish – The Four-Jawed Moray Eel (Fish Maws Part 2)

Weekly Fish – The Four-Jawed Moray Eel (Fish Maws Part 2)

Fishes are a bit unsubtle when it comes to teeth. In their various grabbing, biting, crushing and grinding exercises, many fishes employ teeth not just in their jaws, but also elsewhere, such as on the palate or their gill arches. Indeed, the gills can play an important role in moving food from the mouth down into the stomach. Many fishes have these so-called “pharyngeal jaws”, but it is only in the moray eels that they are truly worthy of the name.
Continue reading “Weekly Fish – The Four-Jawed Moray Eel (Fish Maws Part 2)”

Weekly Fish – The Gulper Eel (Fish Maws Part 1)

Weekly Fish – The Gulper Eel (Fish Maws Part 1)

Most mammals and birds have fairly straightforward mouths; two jaws with single rows of teeth (or none in most birds) and a single joint that lowers or raises the lower jaw, thus opening and closing the mouth. Fishes, however, show a truly staggering diversity in the way they use their mouths, so the coming few weekly fishes will concern fishes with distinctive ones. First up, the most gaping maw of them all. Continue reading “Weekly Fish – The Gulper Eel (Fish Maws Part 1)”

Weekly Fish – An Ode to the Goldfish

Weekly Fish – An Ode to the Goldfish

It is hard to think of a fish that is more mundanely everyday than the goldfish, but this was not always so. When the little golden carp was introduced in Europe in the 18th century, it enjoyed several decades of exalted status among the well-to-do. Known initially as the “kin-yu”, it was imported from China by the British and slowly but steadily made its way through Europe. Early reports from colonists had described it as a very fragile fish (shaking a bowl of goldfish would kill half of them, they said) that was extremely hard to breed. Once introduced to Europe, it was soon found that the goldfish wasn’t all that fragile, and actually really easy to breed, so it soon took over the continent and lost most of its exotic allure. Continue reading “Weekly Fish – An Ode to the Goldfish”